Monday, 29 June 2015 13:28

ATC commissions follow up study

The ATC has teamed up with Aston Univerity for another research project.  This time it is a follow up to Professor James Foreman-Peck's study: 'How investment in languages affects SME exporters' and published by the Assocation in February and launched at the Houses of Parliament. 

The ATC has launched the first UK LSP ranking and bench marking research programme. The summary results are to be published at The 2015 Language Industry Summit taking place in Manchester 24/25 September.
 
 
Sarah Pokorna, Business Development Manager 
ZELENKA, who has just booked her place as delegate to the ATC annual conference said: "This will be the first time anyone from ZELENKA has attended the ATC conference. We’ve chosen to attend so that we can get to know members of the ATC a bit better, and show them what ZELENKA has to offer. I am looking forward to learning something new about the industry, while at the same time meeting new people and hopefully coming away with some new clients!"

Mark Robinson, CEO, Alexika commented looking forward to the ATC's annual conference: “The ATC Conference is an excellent place to network, generate ideas to help our clients and keep up to date with industry trends. I can highly recommend it.”

K-International's Richard Brooks, who is the keynote speaker on the second day of the ATC annual conference, The 2015 Language Industry Summit, has been blogging about the conference.

 

Monday, 29 June 2015 12:55

New companies join the ATC

New members admitted to the Association since the start of the year are:

 

The Association of Translation Companies has just launched The Language Industry Summit Awards. The idea behind them is to recognise and celebrate excellence in the profession.

A new study by professor Foreman-Peck and Dr Peng Zhou launched in February in the House of Commons in partnership with the Association of Translation Companies (ATC), shows in stark detail the impact of in-house language capabilities on small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) that export.

 

A new study by professor Foreman-Peck and Dr Peng Zhou launched today in the House of Commons in partnership with the Association of Translation Companies (ATC), shows in stark detail the impact of in-house language capabilities on small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) that export.

 

The report ‘firm-level evidence for the language investment effect on SME exporters’ shows that SMEs utilising language assets and skills achieved far higher export to turnover ratios than others. These assets and skills included hiring staff with specific language expertise for export needs, employing native language speakers and training  staff in languages

 

Roy Allkin, chaiman of the ATC, said: “The government has repeatedly emphasised that expanding the country’s exports is a key strand of its broader strategy to rebalance the economy. Despite this, the UK has long struggled to improve its trade deficit. An earlier report by professor Foreman-Peck clearly shows that poor language skills is costing UK plc £48bn a year in lost exports. British businesses must take notice of this latest report, which emphasises that one of the secrets of export success is to have a language strategy in place to effectively communicate with target markets.”

 

As well as showing an increase in export to turnover ratio, the findings highlight that companies with in-house language capabilities are much more likely to appreciate the benefits of engaging external professional language services when exporting. Rather than one form of language provision replacing the other, SMEs with in-house language capabilities tend to adopt a twin-track approach to support their global business activities.

 

Professor Foreman-Peck, who is professor of economics at Cardiff University, said: “The results from this study point to the significance of languages for the bottom line of exporting small and medium size enterprises. While there are many factors that can influence export performance, the research was able to isolate many of the factors and give an accurate picture of the impact of language skills on SMEs when selling abroad. Having a strong language strategy by no means guarantees success, but it does increase the likelihood of it quite significantly.”

- See more at: http://www.business-money.com/announcements/new-study-shows-how-vital-languages-are-for-smes-to-export#sthash.GhxODERR.dpuf

A new study by professor Foreman-Peck and Dr Peng Zhou launched today in the House of Commons in partnership with the Association of Translation Companies (ATC), shows in stark detail the impact of in-house language capabilities on small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) that export.

The report ‘firm-level evidence for the language investment effect on SME exporters’ shows that SMEs utilising language assets and skills achieved far higher export to turnover ratios than others. These assets and skills included hiring staff with specific language expertise for export needs, employing native language speakers and training  staff in languages

Roy Allkin, chaiman of the ATC, said: “The government has repeatedly emphasised that expanding the country’s exports is a key strand of its broader strategy to rebalance the economy. Despite this, the UK has long struggled to improve its trade deficit. An earlier report by professor Foreman-Peck clearly shows that poor language skills is costing UK plc £48bn a year in lost exports. British businesses must take notice of this latest report, which emphasises that one of the secrets of export success is to have a language strategy in place to effectively communicate with target markets.”

As well as showing an increase in export to turnover ratio, the findings highlight that companies with in-house language capabilities are much more likely to appreciate the benefits of engaging external professional language services when exporting. Rather than one form of language provision replacing the other, SMEs with in-house language capabilities tend to adopt a twin-track approach to support their global business activities.

Professor Foreman-Peck, who is professor of economics at Cardiff University, said: “The results from this study point to the significance of languages for the bottom line of exporting small and medium size enterprises. While there are many factors that can influence export performance, the research was able to isolate many of the factors and give an accurate picture of the impact of language skills on SMEs when selling abroad. Having a strong language strategy by no means guarantees success, but it does increase the likelihood of it quite significantly.”

- See more at: http://www.business-money.com/announcements/new-study-shows-how-vital-languages-are-for-smes-to-export#sthash.GhxODERR.dpuf

A new study by professor Foreman-Peck and Dr Peng Zhou launched today in the House of Commons in partnership with the Association of Translation Companies (ATC), shows in stark detail the impact of in-house language capabilities on small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) that export.

The report ‘firm-level evidence for the language investment effect on SME exporters’ shows that SMEs utilising language assets and skills achieved far higher export to turnover ratios than others. These assets and skills included hiring staff with specific language expertise for export needs, employing native language speakers and training  staff in languages

Roy Allkin, chaiman of the ATC, said: “The government has repeatedly emphasised that expanding the country’s exports is a key strand of its broader strategy to rebalance the economy. Despite this, the UK has long struggled to improve its trade deficit. An earlier report by professor Foreman-Peck clearly shows that poor language skills is costing UK plc £48bn a year in lost exports. British businesses must take notice of this latest report, which emphasises that one of the secrets of export success is to have a language strategy in place to effectively communicate with target markets.”

As well as showing an increase in export to turnover ratio, the findings highlight that companies with in-house language capabilities are much more likely to appreciate the benefits of engaging external professional language services when exporting. Rather than one form of language provision replacing the other, SMEs with in-house language capabilities tend to adopt a twin-track approach to support their global business activities.

Professor Foreman-Peck, who is professor of economics at Cardiff University, said: “The results from this study point to the significance of languages for the bottom line of exporting small and medium size enterprises. While there are many factors that can influence export performance, the research was able to isolate many of the factors and give an accurate picture of the impact of language skills on SMEs when selling abroad. Having a strong language strategy by no means guarantees success, but it does increase the likelihood of it quite significantly.”

- See more at: http://www.business-money.com/announcements/new-study-shows-how-vital-languages-are-for-smes-to-export#sthash.GhxODERR.dpuf

A new study by Professor James Foreman-Peck and Dr Peng Zhou launched in February in the House of Commons in partnership with the Association of Translation Companies (ATC), shows in stark detail the impact of in-house language capabilities on small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) that export.

Through a series of posters and billboards on the London Underground and railway stations across the country, the posters state ‘I am an immigrant’, accompanied by the job descriptions of real migrants living and working in the UK.

Launched 24 February 2015 in the House of Commons, in partnership with the Association of Translation Companies (ATC), the Firm level evidence for the language investment effect on SME exporters demonstrated the significant impact language skills can have for small and medium-sized enterprises.

News that the euro has tumbled against the pound hitting an 11-year low has sparked concerns over the export potential for UK businesses, according to the Association of Translation Companies (ATC).

The euro weakened to $1.1115 against the dollar last weekend, while the pound reached a seven-year high of €1.34.

While this may be good news for Britons who are looking for a cheap European holiday, it may make exporting abroad to these markets more difficult.

This is part of a wider national challenge where the UK is losing out on 3.5% of GDP in lost exports, due to a lack of language and cultural skills.

The ATC has launched a campaign to help raise awareness of the value of foreign language skills when UK businesses are exporting.

By Geoffrey Bowden, General Secretary of the Association of Translation Companies


The UK is, at its heart, an outward-facing trading nation and British businesses feature across the world in nearly every market. However, we are missing out on significant export opportunities to an estimated £48bn a year because of poor language skills. This is 3.5 per cent of GDP and poses a substantial issue that needs to be overcome if we are to balance the trade deficit. A significant proportion of this lost income comes from small and medium sized enterprises and the Association of Translation Companies (ATC) is running a campaign to highlight the need for exporters to meet the language needs of the markets in which they operate.

By Geoffrey Bowden, General Secretary of the Association of Translation Companies

The UK is, at its heart, an outward-facing trading nation and British businesses feature across the world in nearly every market. However, we are missing out on significant export opportunities to an estimated £48bn a year because of poor language skills. This is 3.5 per cent of GDP and poses a substantial issue that needs to be overcome if we are to balance the trade deficit.

Language investment is the key to success

 

To read the article click here

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